Becoming A Radiologist: How Did Your Doctor Get Here?

Doctors play an important role in the medical world and this is no exception in diagnostic imaging. Our four radiologists are dedicated to providing the best imaging care to our patients from their years of experience and schooling. Let's take a moment to meet our local Kerrville Imaging radiologists. 

Dr. Simone M. Bridges graduated from and received her residency from the University of Texas Health Science Center. She specializes in Musculoskeletal and Diagnostic Radiology and is certified by the American Board of Radiology.

Dr. Alfred C. Roschmann graduated from University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and received his residency from Los Angeles County Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. He specializes in Interventional Radiology and is certified by the American Board of Radiology.

Dr. Tyson D. Hale graduated from University of Texas Medical Branch and received his residency from University of Texas Health Science Center. He specializes in Neuroradiology and is certified by the American Board of Radiology.

Dr. Joe M. Pruneda III graduated from University of Texas Medical Branch and received his residency from TX A&M University Medical School Scott & White Hospital. He specializes in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and is certified by the American Board of Radiology.

Thinking about radiology as a profession? Here are the steps you need to follow to become one of these specialized doctors:

 

1. Get a Bachelors Degree

Most radiologists go to college and get a 4 year Bachelor of Science degree in either chemistry, biology, or physics. Take as many science classes as you can, you’ll certainly need them and start ahead of the game.

 

2. Volunteer

While in school, try volunteering at medical institutions. You want to make sure the medical field is truly for you and that you can see yourself there in 5 years. Ask around local offices. Hospitals are also a great place to learn and usually have volunteer programs.

 

3.  Medical School

After getting your Bachelor of Science comes the fun part, medical school! This is usually for another 4 years. First, you’ll have two years of classroom education in the sciences, such as anatomy, pathology, pharmacology, and biochemistry, preceded by two years of clinical rotations in different areas of medicine such as pediatrics, psychiatry, surgery and internal medicine. This is great hands on experience so when you graduate you’ll not only have what you learned stored away but also hands-on experience.

 

 

4. On the Job Training

Now that you’re finally done with 8 years of schooling, you can complete the part that seemed so far away in the beginning, on the job training! Physicians must complete four years of a radiology residency, which is a combination of specialty medical education and paid on-the-job training, to become a radiologist. Residents complete clinical rotations in different subspecialties of radiology, attend lectures and conduct research.

 

 

5.  Get Licensed

Here’s the last step! It’s no secret that a radiologist must be licensed in order to begin practicing medicine, but did you know these licenses must be renewed occasionally. Radiologists must pass the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) or the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Exam (COMLEX). In addition, many radiologists are certified by the American Board of Radiology (ABR) or the American Osteopathic Board of Radiology (AOBR). Also, board certification is optional but requires continuing education to be maintained which is needed for your career. 

 

It's easy to see that our radiologists are more than qualified to diagnose various diseases and ailments using MRI technology. If you're looking for an amazing on-site radiologist, look no further than Kerrville Imaging.